DAY TWO:
5 SEPTEMBER 2014

9.00 - 10.30 PANEL PRESENTATIONS


PANEL ONE: DOCUMENTARY PRACTICE: LOCAL AND NATIONAL IDENTITIES

Room: Lecture 1, Peter Lanyon Building, Penryn Campus

Chair: Alan Grossman (Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland)

Dalibor Misina (Lakehead University, Canada)
“Beyond Nostalgia: Extrospective Introspections of the Post-Yugoslav Memory of Socialism”

Swarnavel Pillai (Michigan State University, USA)
“Naali: Globalisation, Low End Technology and Documentary Intervention”

Garry Greenaway & David Devanny (Falmouth University, UK)
“Commodified Class Stereotypes in British Documentary & Reality Entertainment”


DAY TWO:
5 SEPTEMBER 2014

9.00 - 10.30
PANEL PRESENTATIONS


PANEL TWO : DOCUMENTING AFGHANISTAN AND PAKISTAN

Room: Lecture 2, Peter Lanyon Building, Penryn Campus, Falmouth University

Chair: Janet Harris (Cardiff University, UK)

Ib Bondebjerg (University of Copenhagen, Denmark)
“Cosmopolitan Narratives: Documentary Perspectives on Afghanistan”

Hassan Zafar (University of Glasgow, UK)
“Decolonising National History: A Postcolonial Perspective of Pakistani Documentary”

Anna Misiak (Falmouth University, UK)
“The Voices of Displaced Afghan Women: Documentaries by Alka Sadat”


DAY TWO:
5 SEPTEMBER 2014

10.30 - 10.45
COFFEE BREAK


COFFEE BREAK

Location: Staff Room, Peter Lanyon Building, Penryn Campus

coffee break


DAY TWO:
5 SEPTEMBER 2014

10.45 - 12.45
DOCUMENTARY SCREENINGS AND
Q&A SESSIONS


SCREENING ONE

Room: Lecture 1 Peter Lanyon Building, Penryn Campus

Promise and Unrest (dir. Alan Grossman & Aine O’Brian, Philippines/Ireland, 2010) 79 mins
Promise and Unrest chronicles a migration story of maternal sacrifice and love labour. Separated from her daughter Gracelle at 7 months, Noemi Barredo left the Philippines for work in Malaysia to support her parents and extended family before arriving in Ireland in 2000. Filmed over a five-year period Promise and Unrest is an intimate portrayal of a Filipino migrant woman performing caregiving and long-distance motherhood, while simultaneously assuming the responsibility of sole provider for her family back in Babatgnon, Philippines. Through the camera lens and mother and daughter’s scripted voice-over narration in both Waray and English, the film observes the material and affective dimensions of global care work, the transnational contingencies of Noemi and Gracelle’s relationship situated in a wider familial context, together with their reunion in Ireland and the beginnings of a domestic life together in the same country for the first time.
Introduction by Alan Grossman (Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland) Followed by Q&A
Moderator: Dario Llinares (Falmouth University, UK)


DAY TWO:
5 SEPTEMBER 2014

10.45 - 12.45
DOCUMENTARY SCREENINGS AND
Q&A SESSIONS


SCREENING TWO

Room: Lecture 2 Peter Lanyon Building, Penryn Campus

HORN (dir. Reina-Marie Loader, Austria/South Africa, 2014) 90 mins

HORN is a lived documentary that seeks to address the poaching question by looking not to Asia, but to the conditions in South Africa itself – conditions which cultivate a perfect breeding ground for animal poaching to develop from the level of petty crime to an organised criminal network. The film however moves beyond the act of poaching to highlight the social dimension of the crisis. HORN thus looks at rhino conservation as a way to positively address some of the underlying factors that pave the way to wildlife crime. The film does so by following a group of rhino monitor trainees as they receive training and are deployed for their first experience in the field as monitors. Their motivation for becoming monitors as well as the socio-economic environment from which they come subtly move viewers towards a perspective that links the fate of the rhino with that of the South African people. The intention is therefore to explore how the most basic form of rhino conservation (rhino monitoring) can play a crucial part in the complicated chain of anti-poaching strategies that seek to safeguard South Africa’s dwindling rhino population. In this way, HORN comments on the rhino’s important status as a heritage of national import in a country fraught with ongoing social and economic inequalities. This perspective is supported by the contributions of significant political and community leaders in South Africa as well as figures working at the forefront of rhino conservation. HORN consequently not only highlights some of the problems facing rhino conservation, but also points out some of the significant social problems facing the communities in the affected areas – specifically in relation to education, security and accountability.

Introduction by Reina-Marie Loader (Independent Filmmaker, Austria) Followed by Q & A
Moderator: Sarah Arnold (Falmouth University, UK)


DAY TWO:
5 SEPTEMBER 2014

12.45 - 13.30 LUNCH


LUNCH BREAK

Location: Staff Room, Peter Lanyon Building, Penryn Campus

lunch break


DAY TWO:
5 SEPTEMBER 2014

13.30-14.15
KEYNOTE LECTURE


KEYNOTE LECTURE

Room: Cinema, School of Film & Television, Penryn Campus

Patrick Hurley (Distribution Manager, Dogwoof)

Trends in Theatrical Distribution for Feature Documentaries by Dogwoof

Patrick Hurley is Distribution Manager at Dogwoof, the UK’s leading specialist documentary distributor and sales agent. Recent theatrical releases by Dogwoof include The Act of Killing (BAFTA 2014), Blackfish, Cutie and the Boxer, Chasing Ice and Ken Loach’s The Spirit of ’45. As a distributor, Dogwoof have championed documentary for the big screen including feature films from the Sensory Ethnography Lab (Manakamana, Leviathan and Sweetgrass) as well as re-releasing remastered classics such as Marc Singer’s Dark Days (2000). With the company since 2012, Patrick has worked on the cinema releases of Dogwoof’s 40 most recent titles.


DAY TWO:
5 SEPTEMBER 2014

14.15 - 14.30
COFFEE BREAK


COFFEE BREAK

Location: Lobby, School of Film & Television, Penryn Campus

coffee break


DAY TWO:
5 SEPTEMBER 2014

14.30 - 16.30
DOCUMENTARY SCREENING


DOCUMENTARY SCREENING

Room: Cinema, School of Film & Television, Penryn Campus

Manakamana (dir. Stephanie Spray and Pacho Velez, Nepal/USA, 2013) 118 min

UK Preview Screening

High above a jungle in Nepal, pilgrims make an ancient journey by cable car to worship Manakamana. Manakamana is the latest feature film from the Sensory Ethnography Lab at Harvard University.


DAY TWO:
5 SEPTEMBER 2014

16.30 - 18.30 BREAK


BREAK

break


DAY TWO:
5 SEPTEMBER 2014

18.30 - 20.45
SCREENING


IN CONVERSATION WITH NICK FRASER (BBC COMMISSIONER) + STORYVILLE SCREENING: THE ENGLISH SURGEON (2007/08)

Location: The Poly, 24 Church Street, Falmouth

Moderator: Neil Fox (Falmouth University, UK)

Event open to the general public. Tickets available from The Poly, 24 Church St, Falmouth, Cornwall TR11 3EG

the poly


DAY TWO:
5 SEPTEMBER 2014

20.45 - 21.00 BREAK


BREAK

break


DAY TWO:
5 SEPTEMBER 2014

21.00- 22.30
DOCUMENTARY SCREENING


21.00- 22.30 DOCUMENTARY SCREENING

(IN PARTNERSHIP WITH CORNWALL FILM FESTIVAL)

Location: The Poly, 24 Church Street, Falmouth

Return to Homs (dir. Tatal Derki, Syria/Germany, 2013) 90 mins

Nineteen-year-old Basset is the goalkeeper for the Syrian national soccer team. When revolution breaks out the charismatic young man becomes an iconic protest leader and singer. His songs reflect his dream of peaceful liberation from Assad’s brutal regime. Osama is a 24- year-old media activist and pacifist wielding his camera to document the revolution. But when the army cracks down and their beloved Homs becomes a bombed-out ghost town, these two peaceful protesters take up arms and transform into renegade insurgents, with devastating results. Winner of the World Cinema Grand Jury Prize: Documentary Sundance 2014.

Event open to the general public. Tickets available from The Poly, 24 Church St, Falmouth, Cornwall TR11 3EG

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the poly